Tuesday, June 03, 2008

Online document creation in a Flash

Post details:
• Adobe introduces Acrobat.com
• A review of the features

Microsoft and Google, watch out for Adobe.

On Monday (6/2), Adobe released the public beta of Acrobat.com, a product for online document creation and sharing. Think Google Docs, but by Adobe and all in its powerhouse software Flash.

The new Web site allows users to create simple documents and collaborate with other users (using Buzzword) and when you are finished, you can export the file as a PDF, Word document, among other file types. With Share, you can upload up to 5.12 gigs of files, share the files with others and create PDFs. ConnectNow, the third part of the semi-disconnected set of offerings, allows users to communicate multifariously via different "Pods": chat, Web cam, file view, white board, screen sharing and note sharing - all at one URL. You can even use microphones to create a true conference. And remember, this is all done in Flash. No software required (except Flash, that is) and only one member of the group needs to be registered with Acrobat.com.

Create an account and you're off flying.

This year Adobe seems to be on fire online. With its online version of PhotoShop and its somewhat unknown media player, Adobe TV, the San Jose-based company is really pushing its online features.

After some shorts trials, Adobe's new online software offerings are impressive for what they do (the ease of networking especially), but I do not see them replacing desktop software anytime soon. And why would software companies want them to? These online ventures are free – for now – for the consumer.

Adobe's new online word processing software is taking on Google Docs and Microsoft Office Live Workspace to name a few of the top offerings. One of Adobe's issues with its new offering is that it is not in connection with some existing e-mail account (think Gmail, here), though registration is very simple and you can begin working in about a minute. Google Docs are connect with a Google account so it's one-stop shopping. Plus, with Microsoft's Office Live I would be sharing documents I created in Microsoft Word, Excel or PowerPoint so the idea is that it would be easier. Adobe just needs to prove itself.

But if the software is good, users will come.

Links:
Acrobat.com Information

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